Regional speciality: zoom on Bordeaux’s canelé

This small rum- and vanilla-flavoured cake is Bordeaux’s emblematic pastry. Delicately-caramelized pastry crust and an ever-so indulging fondant centre: discover its history, how to make it and where to taste it!

The legend of Bordeaux’s Canelé

The origins are lost in the mists of time but legend has it that canelés were created in the convent of the Sisters of the Annunciation in Bordeaux. The nuns made them for paupers with wheat retrieved on the quay sides – which had fallen from boat holds or which came from punctured sacks – and with egg yolks which were unused by the wineries of the Quai des Chartrons (egg whites were used as finings for wine).

As Bordeaux was one of the major trading ports, the nuns added rum and vanilla from tropical islands to their recipe.

Following the convent’s closure and the French Revolution, the recipe became decreasingly cast aside until the 1980s. The canelé, revised and revamped by a handful of professionals, returned to the stage in pastry shops and in the hearts of the Bordeaux population.

Today, it is one of the culinary symbols of the City of Bordeaux. And, even has its own canelé brotherhood.
The word, originally spelt “cannelé” officially became “canelé” in 1985 when this same brotherhood deleted the second “n” so as to assert its identity. This is why it is commonly found nowadays spelt both ways!

Did you know?
Every year during the Bordeaux SO Good Festival a world canelé championship is held: “cannelénium”. Three levels of competition: professional, apprentice and amateur… and always the same sweet delight!

Frise

The Bordeaux canelé recipe

Preparation: 20 minutes + 12 to 24 h left aside
Cooking: 30 minutes
Equipment: preferably copper canelé moulds, otherwise silicone moulds

Ingredients (for 12 canelés):

½ l milk
1 vanilla pod
250 g sugar
125 g flour
6 egg yolks
50 g melted butter (including 5 g to butter the moulds)
5 cl rum

Preparation

  1. The day before:
    Heat the milk with the vanilla.
    Mix the sugar with the egg yolks then add the flour.
    Pour the hot milk over the preparation, then add the melted butter. Stir vigorously to make sure there are no lumps.
    Flavour with rum.

  2. Leave to sit for 12 to 24 hours in the fridge prior to cooking.

  3. Butter the canelé moulds then fill them ¾ full with the mixture and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour at 180°C in a preheated oven.

Leave to cool before removing from the moulds.
Canelés can be eaten at any time of the day and are ideally accompanied by tea or coffee at the end of a meal.

Where to find the best canelés in Bordeaux?

canele baillardran bordeaux

MORE
IDEAS 

RELATED
ARTICLES 

The Basque cake is a traditional, highly-popular, country-style pastry from the Basque Country.

The nuns from the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Bonne-Espérance ‘Our Lady of Good Hope) have blended together the flavours...

When competition time is over, the stars of the oval ball welcome you to their fiefdom. Here’s my selection of the...

Twice a week, the heart of the medieval town buzzes with colourful stalls overflowing with local produce and tales of...

An excellent fruit certified with two distinctive quality labels (Red Label and AOP) to enjoy to the full in preparation...

Périgord is famous for its duck and its truffles, but is less known for its cheeses. A quick look at Périgord’s...

RELATED
ARTICLES 

The Basque cake is a traditional, highly-popular, country-style pastry from the Basque Country.

The nuns from the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Bonne-Espérance ‘Our Lady of Good Hope) have blended together the flavours...

When competition time is over, the stars of the oval ball welcome you to their fiefdom. Here’s my selection of the...

Twice a week, the heart of the medieval town buzzes with colourful stalls overflowing with local produce and tales of...

An excellent fruit certified with two distinctive quality labels (Red Label and AOP) to enjoy to the full in preparation...

Périgord is famous for its duck and its truffles, but is less known for its cheeses. A quick look at Périgord’s...